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PhD Programme in Public Administration

The aim of the PhD program at the School of Public Administration is to foster an enriching, dynamic and rigorous research environment that provides doctoral students with the necessary theoretical knowledge, along with both the methodological and practical skills allowing them to analyze a broad range of public sector-related phenomena.

The doctoral program is interdisciplinary, drawing upon social science fields such as anthropology, economics, organization studies, political science and sociology. The program is decidedly pluralist in terms of methodology, encouraging students to develop novel approaches to the analysis of research puzzles.

Courses in the program are offered at the School of Public Administration, and students also have the opportunity to take courses at other departments and faculties in the university as well as at other universities in Sweden and abroad. Our courses are offered in both English and Swedish.

Graduates of the PhD program are well positioned for careers in academia, as well as in governmental bodies, non-governmental organizations, and private organizations. Recent graduates are employed at Lund University, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Karlstad University, and Örebro University. Others are employed in the Swedish Social Insurance Agency, the Government Offices of Sweden, and the Swedish International Center for Local Democracy, as well as Price Waterhouse Cooper.

We collaborate with other relevant PhD programs both in Scandinavia and globally, and we are actively interested in establishing additional partnerships.

Contact information

David Karlsson
Associate Professor
Director of Doctoral Studies
Telephone: 46 (0)31 786 17 41
 

Page Manager: Anna Andersson|Last update: 1/30/2014
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